Date of BirthAugust 08, 1927

Stanley M. Haugland Obituary

Date of BirthAugust 08, 1927

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Date of DeathFebruary 08, 2017

Stanley M. Haugland Obituary

from Buffalo, Iowa, United States

Dr. Stanley M. HauglandPleasant HillStanley Maynard Haugland, 89, of Pleasant Hill, Iowa, died on February 8, 2017. He was born on a small farm in Minnesota on August 8, 1927. He was the fourth child out of five children born to Oscar and Ellen Haugland. He grew up with his three brothers and one sister in Thompson, Iowa. At the age of 10, his father was killed accidentally from being hit by a car at the start of the depression. As a result, his mother raised her five children in a fair amount of poverty but in a home filled with love, caring, and an emphasis on education. While he was growing up, he worked part-time delivering milk, delivering the newspaper, and working for a grocer. In the summers he went and worked for one of his uncles on a farm. He graduated from Thompson high school in 1945. He served in the Merchant Marines from 1945 to 1947 where he sailed the world including Hawaii, Africa, and Greece. After getting out of the Merchant Marines, he went on to study mortuary science in Chicago from 1947 to 1950. After getting his mortician's license, he moved back to Iowa and found work in Buffalo Center. There he was set up on a blind date with his future wife, Jean. They had met to play cards with friends but Jean did not have a ride home. Rumor has it they may have parked near the cemetery for some private time before Stan dropped her off at home. This was the start of a beautiful lifelong romance. Unfortunately, the Korean War intervened and Stan was drafted into the army. He was assigned to the 32nd combat regiment. During the final assignments, by virtue of having a mortician's license, he was reassigned to the military mortuary in Japan. He served in the Korean War from 1950 to 1952. Upon being discharged from the army, he returned to Iowa where he was promptly contacted by Jean's cousin Maxine, and told that he had to get back in touch with Jean right away. They had been writing letters to each other while he was in the army. Stan got back together with Jean and they got married on the farm shortly after his arrival back in Buffalo Center. Stan and Jean moved to Iowa City where Stan enrolled at the University of Iowa with plans to study pre-medicine. They lived in a quonset hut at student housing and only had a small motorbike for transportation. While there, Stan helped to support his family by working as a mortician at the University of Iowa Hospitals. While raising their first child Mark in Iowa City, they had their second child, a daughter named Signe. Unfortunately, Signe died within a year. After Stan was accepted into medical school they went on to have their third child, a daughter named Louisa. Stan graduated from University of Iowa College of Medicine in 1958. They then moved to Cedar Rapids, Iowa where he undertook his internship. While living in Cedar Rapids, they had their fourth child, a son named Frank. After completing his internship, they moved to Lake Mills, Iowa where he went on to practice family medicine until 1975. Stan often said that being a small town doctor was the best job he ever had. He loved taking care of people and it made no difference to him whether they could afford to pay or not. He often made house calls. On occasion, patients might pay him in barter with a chicken or with a basket full of sweet corn. In 1975, Stan left Lake Mills to become the medical director of the Powell Chemical Dependency Center at Iowa Methodist Medical Center in Des Moines. Stan had an amazing career as the medical director of the Powell Chemical Dependency Center from 1975 until 1999. During that time, he helped thousands of patients find and maintain sobriety and freedom from alcohol and drugs. Since he himself had also been through treatment for alcoholism he truly could empathize with the patients who came under his care. One of his main points of emphasis was that in order to successfully get sober and clean, the patient had to transfer their dependence on chemicals over to dependence on other people, including their friends in AA and their family members. He also had a profound sense of gratitude for his own sobriety, the feeling that every sober daywas a gift. He also published numerous articles and book chapters on chemical dependency. For his service, he received a Making A Difference Award from Iowa Methodist Medical Center and a Key to the City of Des Moines from the mayor. After stepping down as director of Powell, Stan became involved in geriatric medicine. He continued to do that on a part-time basis from 1999 until he retired completely in 2008. Outside of medicine, Stan had a great variety of interests. He enjoyed building things with his hands, and over the years he built two sailboats, an actual wooden airplane, and a variety of furniture for the home. He enjoyed sailing on Saylorville Reservoir for many years with his family and friends. In later years, he gave up the sailboat and got into driving antique railroad cars as part of a railroad association. His railroading included a trip from central Manitoba up to Churchill on the shore of the Hudson Bay. He also enjoy traveling, and took two trips to Russia as well as a cruise to see an eclipse of the sun with his wife, Jean. He loved to read a wide variety of subjects including philosophy, astronomy and Russian history. He read the National Geographic, Astronomy, Scientific American, and others every month. Through his study of philosophy he learned that the two most common features of truly happy people were gratitude and forgiveness. Stan had these two characteristics ingrained very deeply inside of him. Every day he felt that he had been extraordinarily fortunate and he never held a grudge against anyone. He also liked to play jokes on his friends and family. In around 1967, wherever he went, he would find the calendar, turn it to August 8, and secretly write "Don't forget Dr. Haugland's birthday!". He received over 300 birthday cards that year! He was a good father and helped his children earn a good education. He was very devoted to Jean, and stood by her as she pursued college and then a long career in the Democratic Party. His devotion was shown when, in the spring of 2016, he was taken by ambulance to the ER for benign heart racing. When his son and grandson brought him safely home at 1:30 AM, he walked quickly over to Jean saying "I didn't want to leave you! I didn't want to leave you!" As far as we are concerned, he never did and they are still together now.He is survived by his children Mark, Louisa (Dan), and Frank (Krista); his grandchildren Matt (Eryn), Katie (Eric), Karla, Stanley, Hayden, Ben, and Jakob (Ashley); his sister in law, Maxine; and many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by daughter, Signe; his parents; his sister Connie, his brothers Joe, Oscar, and Frank. His family wants to share deep gratitude to The Shores at Pleasant Hill. And, are grateful for the friendship of Ivan Lyddon.Services for Stanley and Jean, who passed away on February 12th, will be held at 2:00 P.M. Saturday February 18th, 2017 at Iles Grandview Park Chapel, 3211 Hubbell Ave. Des Moines, IA. Visitation will be from 12:00 noon till 2:00 P.M. A reception will follow the service.Memorials may be sent to the Dr. Stan Haugland Endowment benefitting Powel *CDC, % UnityPoint Health Foundation, 1415 Woodland Ave., Suite E-200, Des Moines, IA 50309.

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