Date of BirthFebruary 25, 1918

Nancy Kengla Jones Obituary

Date of BirthFebruary 25, 1918

281 Views

Date of DeathDecember 07, 2016

Nancy Kengla Jones Obituary

from Thornton, Iowa, United States

Nancy Kengla JonesDes MoinesNancy Kengla Jones, 98, peacefully passed away of natural causes December 7, 2016 at the Wesley Acres Health Center in Des Moines. A private family burial will be held in Masonic Cemetery at a later date. No services are planned.Nancy was born on February 25, 1918 to Alice and Herbert Kengla in Washington, D.C. She finished high school at age 16 and then graduated from Trinity College, where she majored in chemistry. Her first job was in Niagara Falls, New York, in the patent department of the Carburundum Company. After six months, she returned home and enrolled in the George Washington University law school, with the intention of becoming a patent attorney. While in law school, classmate Edward H. Jones from Des Moines asked if he could borrow her notes from a class he had missed. He claimed he could not read her writing and asked if he could come to her house so she could translate the notes. One thing led to another, and after Nancy and Ed graduated from law school (where both were members of Law Review), they married in 1942. Nancy worked in D.C. for the Federal Reserve Board and the Department of Justice while Ed served as a Lieutenant Commander in the Navy. After Ed's ship was decommissioned, he and Nancy moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts, where Ed taught ciphers and codes at Harvard to incoming Naval officers. It was in Cambridge that Edward H. Jones, Jr. (Ned), the first of the Jones children, was born in 1944. After the war, Nancy, Ed and Ned moved to Des Moines, where Ed joined a local law firm and Nancy passed the Iowa bar exam. Deborah, the second of the Jones children, was born in 1946, followed by Abigail in 1950. Over the years, Nancy held several jobs. She headed a section of census takers in 1960, worked as a Gallup Poll taker, worked at Ben Gibson's book store, helped develop curriculum for adult education and became a stock broker with the R.W. Baird Company at age 65.Nancy was a daughter, wife, mother, grandmother, great grandmother, lawyer, stockbroker, avid reader, world traveler, feminist, tennis player, golfer, bridge player, Scrabble lover and crossword puzzle enthusiast. She served on the board of the Des Moines public library and was a member of the Junior League, Wakonda Club, Proteus, Chapter Q, P.E.O., Petticoat Mutual stock club, the Iowa State Bar Association and the Polk County Bar Association.Nancy is survived by her children, Deborah Thornton (Jerry) of Des Moines and Abigail Nash (Dr. David) of Milwaukee; six grandchildren, Jessica and Megan Thornton (Chris), Ted and Tom Jones (Susan), Katherine Samson (Josh) and Michael Nash (Barbara) and 18 great grandchildren. She was preceded in death by Edward H. Jones, her husband of 44 years, and her son, Edward H. Jones, Jr. (Marilyn).Memorial contributions may be made to the Des Moines Public Library Foundation or to Camp Hertko Hollow, a camp for diabetic children. The family is most appreciative for the care provided by the staff of Wesley Acres and by Dr. Deanna Questad, Nancy's physician of many years.Nancy suffered from severe dementia, a great tragedy for someone who once had such a brilliant mind. The author of the following is unknown, but it could have been written by Nancy herself.HEART MEMORIES: I remember you with my heart. My mind won't say your name. I can't recall where I knew you. Who you were or who I was. But I do know you. I know I knew you. And I do love you. I know how you made me feel. I remember the feelings we had together. My heart remembers. It cries out in loneliness for you. For the feelings you give me now. Today I'm happy you have come. When you leave my mind will not remember you were here. But my heart remembers. Remembers the feeling of friendship and love returned. Remembers that I am less lonely and happier today because of the feeling. Because you have come. Please, please, don't forget me. And please don't stay away because of the way my mind acts. I can still feel you. I can remember with my heart. And a heart memory is maybe the most important memory of all.